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Does it make any sense to try dump down Rice Lake to protect lake properties there?

  1. Yes, a lot of sense
  2. Not much
  3. Little
  4. Waste of time and money
 
 
 
 
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Comments

(9)

locomotive

Apr-17-13 9:48 AM

No, I don't think it was a typo...

1 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

rajiihammr

Apr-17-13 10:04 AM

I've never heard the term, 'dump down'. Lower...drain?

2 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

centerfield

Apr-17-13 10:33 AM

Will we need to get Canada's permission to "dumb down" the lake?

0 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

EarlyBird

Apr-17-13 11:21 AM

Most natural lakes have a high water line where the waves washed against the shorelines usually overgrown with vegetation but still discernible.Correct me if I'm wrong but I think Rice lake has a retaining structure in place to form the lake so it becomes a learning process with no geological records pertaining to water levels to use in deciding what level Rice Lake should be.

4 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

muleskinner

Apr-17-13 1:04 PM

Rice Lake:

"Rice Lake is located in Ward County, North Dakota, 16 miles south and 11 miles west of Minot, North Dakota (Figure 1). It is a natural freshwater lake found in the Coteau region of North Dakota. This region is located between the Missouri River uplands and the glaciated plains of eastern North Dakota. The region is unique because there are almost no streams or stream valleys. Melting glaciers of the Wisconsinan age left behind an irregular landscape of hills and flat lands with natural lakes and wetlands in the depressions (NDGS, 2000). These lakes are not connected by typical stream networks, but are connected by groundwater flow through deep glacial sediments."

***********ndhealth.gov/WQ/SW/Z2_TMDL/TMDLs_Completed/Southwest/Rice_Lake_TMDL_Final.pdf

1 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

EarlyBird

Apr-17-13 2:42 PM

Yep, so with the structure in place causing a higher water level than nature intended the old shoreline is probably underwater.

***********mytopo****/locations/index.cfm?fid=1033133

1 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

animal

Apr-17-13 6:16 PM

A lot of babble, but no real answers.

1 Agrees | 2 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

Seriouslydoe

Apr-17-13 6:28 PM

I'm going with 'pump' down.

2 Agrees | 0 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

EarlyBird

Apr-17-13 6:30 PM

Animal..The answer is there but I doubt it is what people want to hear. It involves water and gravity of course, hyrdostatic pressure, artesian aquifer and obstruction.

1 Agrees | 1 Disagrees | Report Abuse »

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